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Sustainable 2nd Century

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Campus Progress: Green Building Ratings

Exterior photo of Jess S. Jackson Sustainable Winery Building

In 2014, the Jess S. Jackson Sustainable Winery Building (pictured) was honored as the Best Overall Sustainable Design in the tenth annual Energy Efficiency and Sustainable Design Best Practice Awards program. Previously, in 2005, Gladys Valley Hall was honored as the Best Overall Sustainable Design in this statewide best practices competition.

All new buildings at UC Davis are required to meet standards equivalent to the U.S. Green Building Council's LEED® (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Silver certification. Some campus buildings meet standards that are equivalent to LEED standards, but are neither registered nor certified. Certified buildings have completed third-party certification. Registered buildings are either awaiting construction completion or awaiting third-party certification. 

Find out more about building management at UC Davis and which campus buildings meet green standards.

To learn about each of our green buildings, select a rating system:

LEED® for New Construction & Major Renovations™

This rating system focuses on the design and construction of new buildings and major renovations on existing buildings.

LEED-certified Platinum

Exterior photo of Gallagher Hall and the Conference Center
Gallagher Hall and Conference Center
Maurice J. Gallagher, Jr. Hall, occupied by the Graduate School of Management, and the adjacent Conference Center are certified LEED Platinum — the top level for LEED construction standards. The buildings use a ground-source heat pump for radiant heating and cooling, and have an innovative rain screen design that helps mitigate solar heat gain. Natural daylight is passively controlled by the buildings' orientation, clerestory windows and a large light well, which save energy used for artificial lighting.
Exterior photo of Gladys Valley Hall
Gladys Valley Hall 
Gladys Valley Hall, a veterinary instructional facility, was honored as the Best Overall Sustainable Design in 2005 in the statewide Best Practices Competition. Natural ventilation cools the building's common spaces, with thermal and humidity sensors that control ventilation louvers. The building uses a night-flush strategy to release heat absorbed during the day with circulated night air that pre-cools the structure, to help moderate indoor air temperatures for the following day. Read more about Valley Hall (PDF) and see photographs of the building.
Photo of Segundo Services Center's green roof
Segundo Services Center
The Segundo Services Center has a green roof with seating area and rooftop solar photovoltaic cells. The center also uses a "chilled beam" system for efficient indoor temperature control. Additional building features include: Solar light tubes installed at the maintenance workshop supply sufficient natural light so that artificial lighting is not required on most days; operable windows provide natural ventilation throughout the building; Water efficient landscape choices include “smart” irrigation controllers with rain sensors and pressure-regulating sprinkler heads; and the building has a green cleaning and educational program.
Interior photo of the Student Community Center
Student Community Center
The Student Community Center has an open lobby concept with large skylights that provide abundant natural daylighting and has operable windows for natural ventilation. The building is 28 percent more energy efficient than Title 24. The building will be outfitted with rooftop solar PV’s. The landscaping includes pervious paving and a bioswale to filter storm drainage.
Aerial photo of the Tahoe Center for Environmental Studies
Tahoe Center for Environmental Sciences 
The home of the UC Davis Tahoe Environmental Research Center has been noted as the first laboratory to use "active" chilled beams, which moves ventilation air through ceiling-mounted diffuser boxes for increased cooling efficiency at low investment costs. The building's energy efficiency is also boosted with radiant floor heating, a cooling tower and cold water storage. The building has 875 photovoltaic shingles on its roof.
Thumbnail of the teaching winery building.
Teaching & Research Winery August A. Busch III Brewing and Food Science Laboratory 
This UC Davis facility is the first brewery, winery or food processing facility in the world to be LEED Platinum certified. The two-wing building houses teaching and research activities in the August A. Busch III Brewing and Food Science Laboratory and the Teaching and Research Winery. The facilities will serve as a model for sustainability in each industry, with a focus on water and energy efficiency in the building's design.  This facility has a large-scale water capture system used for irrigation and toilets that saves about 300,000 gallons of water annually. Photovoltaic panels on the building's roof are estimated to produce more energy than the building currently uses. The building also has a capture system for the carbon dioxide from the fermentation process, with future plans to sequester the carbon dioxide instead of releasing it into the atmosphere. Real-time data from the facility's water and electrical metering displays for visitors in the lobby, to help showcase the building's sustainable features. A comprehensive recycling and composting plan was also designed for the facility, with help from a UC Davis student project. View videos and learn more at the project website.
Photo of the side of a Tercero building
Tercero Student Housing: Phase 3
Phase 3 includes seven residence halls. A condensing economizer uses energy derived from waste water vapor to provide heat and hot water for the buildings, saving hundreds of thousands of therms of natural gas. The buildings exceed the state's energy efficiency requirements by more than 48 percent. 95 percent of construction waste from the building project was diverted from the landfill. Additionally, low-emitting materials were selected for adhesives, sealants, paints, coatings, flooring systems, composite wood and agrifiber products. Read more about the residence halls here: Tercero 3: Our most sustainable residence halls yet.

LEED-certified Gold

Exterior photo of the Student Health and Wellness Center
Student Health and Wellness Center 
The Student Health and Wellness Center is 42 percent more energy efficient than a typical medical office building, which is largely due to the energy efficient heating & cooling system. Heat and cool air are delivered to the building through chilled beams—fixtures which are essentially one-foot wide by 4-, 5- or 6-feet long and hang from the ceiling to deliver cooling and heating with low airflow and virtually no noise. Other sustainable aspects of the building are its highly reflective roof and its small green roof that both serve to minimize the building's heat-island effect on the surrounding microclimate. The Health and Wellness Center also offers a wellness garden for a quiet, reflective place to rest, exercise or reflect.
Thumbnail of Wall Hall in the Tercero Student Housing area
Tercero Student Housing: Wall, Campbell and Potter Halls 
Wall, Campbell and Potter Halls have chutes for collecting recyclable materials, solar thermal panels on the roof and a whole-building ventilation system for nighttime cooling. The residence halls also have a "green cleaning" policy and program, and an active education program that informs occupants about green building practices. For more information, please see the Project Planning Presentation, the LEED Case Study, and the Fact Sheet.

LEED-certified Silver

No buildings are LEED-certified Silver for New Construction and Major Renovations.

LEED-registered

Exterior photo of Veterinary Medicine 3B
Veterinary Medicine 3B
Plans for this building were honored as the Best Overall Sustainable Design in 2009 in the statewide Best Practices Competition. The open laboratory floor plan for this building optimizes daylight with glazing between offices on the perimeter of the building and offices further interior. It also separates offices that can use natural ventilation and operable windows from more ventilation-intensive laboratory space. Building plans call for a reclaimed water system to supply dual-flush, low-flow toilets. Occupant sensors for lighting and ventilation and desktop air delivery with local controls will provide for efficiency and comfort.
King Hall expansion 
The King Hall expansion project included the extensive use of recycled materials, including shredded denim blue jeans for insulation. Automatic light controls reduce energy use, window sensors automatically adjust heating and air conditioning, and drought resistant plans reduce potable water consumption by 50 percent. The new building exceeds the state's energy efficiency standards by over 25 percent and large trees were planted in the coutyard to maximize shade. Sunshading and high performance glass also reduces solar heat gain in the building. Read more about the expansion project on King Hall's website.

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LEED® for Commercial Interiors™

This rating system focuses on sustainable tenant spaces in commercial and institutional buildings.

LEED-certified Platinum

No buildings are LEED-certified Platinum for Commercial Interiors.

LEED-certified Gold

Interior photo of the Coffee House
Coffee House renovation
The Coffee House renovation improved the daylighting and comfort of the facility. The project salvaged an extensive amount of existing structure and equipment. The lighting was replaced with highly efficient fixtures, the plumbing fixtures were replaced with low flow fixtures and the hoods were retrofitted with Melink variable speed fans to save energy. The Coffee House also implemented a post-consumer composting program following this renovation.
Cuarto Dining Commons
The renovation of Cuarto Dining Commons reused more than 41 percent of its original interior elements. Approximately 40 percent of new building materials used in the renovation were manufactured within 500 miles of the site. The building has a solar water preheat system that reduces the energy required to heat the water that supplies the commercial dishwasher.  Cuarto has a green cleaning program, as well as an education program that informs occupants about the sustainable practices and options provided within the building.
Interior photo of Robbins Hall
Robbins Hall renovation
Robbins Hall is a lab building with extensive renovation to lighting and the heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems. Of particular note with this building is the reuse of lab casework.

LEED-certified Silver

No buildings are LEED-certified Silver for Commercial Interiors

LEED-registered

King Hall renovation

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LEED® for Existing Buildings: Operations and Maintenance™

This rating system is a whole-building rating system (individual tenant spaces aren't elligible) that focuses on holistic building operations - from building energy efficiency to employees' sustainable practices.

LEED-certified Gold

Exterior photo of Giedt Hall
Giedt Hall
Occupancy sensors in Giedt Hall reduce lighting energy use and room temperature while providing efficient lighting when needed. The heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system is electronically monitored with a Building Automated System, which allows settings to be programmed and remotely controlled. Much of the building hardscape reduces heat island impacts by utilizing shade, reflectance and open-grid paving. Indoor potable water use is 16.67% below the LEED baseline. The classroom building participates in the High Performance Green Cleaning Program through the use of green cleaning products and practices and custodial training. 
Exterior photo of the Mathematical Sciences Building
Mathematical Sciences Building
The Mathematical Sciences Building, built in 2005, had many pre-existing sustainable features, such as an energy efficient HVAC system. The HVAC system is electronically monitored and remotely controlled by Facilities Management with a Building Automated System. Occupancy sensors and a lighting retrofit throughout the building reduce the lighting load and provide efficient lighting when needed. 76% of the building has access to outside views, which provide natural daylighting. The building participates in the High Performance Green Cleaning Program to ensure a healthier building environment. 
Exterior photo of Mrak Hall

Mrak Hall

Mrak Hall, built in 1966 in honor of Chancellor Emil Mrak, now houses the Office of the Chancellor and Provost, the Office of the Vice Chancellor and Chief Financial Officer, the Environmental Stewardship and Sustainability office, Community Relations, Student Affairs, the College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences dean's office, and several other administrative offices and units. Notable sustainable performance criteria include: a high Energy STAR score (90), compared to similar buildings, earning 15 of 18 points for Energy Efficiency Performance; potable water usage 27% below the LEED baseline; nearly 90% of electric durable goods purchases met or exceeded sustainable procurement criteria; a successful waste audit; mats installed at all main entrances to reduce dirt, dust, pollen and other particles entering the building; purchase and use of lamps with reduced mercury content; and participation in the High Performance Green Cleaning Program through the use of green cleaning products and practices and custodial training.

LEED-certified Silver

Thumbnail of the exterior of Emerson Hall
Emerson Hall
Emerson Hall has reduced indoor potable water use by 37.97% compared to the LEED baseline and newly installed smart thermostats have reduced energy usage by 24%. The building has occupancy sensors, which reduce the lighting load, and a High Performance Green Cleaning Program, which includes purchasing green cleaining products and implementing green cleaning practices. Emerson Hall also holds an ENERGY STAR Label.
Thumbnail of the exterior of Webster Hall
Webster Hall
Webster Hall has reduced indoor potable water use by 37.96% compared to the LEED baseline and newly installed smart thermostats have reduced energy usage by 24%. The building also has occupancy sensors and a High Performance Green Cleaning Program. Like Emerson, Webster holds an ENERGY STAR Label.
Landscape photo of the Sciences Laboratory building
Sciences Laboratory Building
The Sciences Laboratory Building, which opened in 2005, is one of the most advanced science teaching facilities in California. It houses 34 lab classrooms, two computer labs, a teaching greenhouse, five student discussion rooms and learning centers, and offices. Within the building's operations, there is a "green cleaning" policy and program, indoor chemical and pollutant source control, and stormwater quality control.

LEED-certified

Interior photo of Dr. Ullman's lab in Hutchison Hall
Hutchison Hall

Hutchison Hall houses microbiology labs, the DNA Sequencing Lab, Plant Pathology and Nematology departments, three public computer labs, the Mediaworks video edit/duplication facility, and classrooms. The HVAC system is electronically monitored and remotely controlled by Facilities Management with a Building Automated System. Indoor potable water use is  27% below the LEED baseline. Entryway mats or grills were installed to reduce outdoor contaminants that adversely affect indoor air quality. The building participates in the High Performance Green Cleaning Program to ensure a healthier building environment.

LEED-registered

Thumbnail of the Western Human Nutrition Research Center
Western Human Nutrition Research Center

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ENERGY STAR®

The Environmental Protection Association's ENERGY STAR certification program recognizes energy efficiency in commercial buildings and industrial plants. To be certified buildings must earn a score of 75 or higher (which means the building is more energy efficient than at least 75% of similar buildings in the country).

ENERGY STAR certified

Emerson Hall
Emerson Hall makes use of smart vanity lighting systems, a "green cleaning" policy and program, and an active educational program for occupants. Its ENERGY STAR score is 77, which means that Emerson Hall performs better than at least 77% of similar buildings nationwide. Emerson Hall is also LEED EBOM certified at the silver level.
Webster Hall
Webster Hall also makes use of smart vanity lighting systems, a "green cleaning" policy and program, and an active educational program for occupants. It also has an advanced thermostat control system. Its ENERGY STAR score is 75, which means that it performs better than at least 75% of similar buildings nationwide. Webster Hall is also LEED EBOM certified at the silver level.

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Living Building™

The Living Building Challenge focuses on seven building performance areas: site, water, energy, health, materials, equity, and beauty.

Living Building registered

Exterior photo of the Jess S. Jackson Sustainable Winery Building
Jess S. Jackson Sustainable Winery Building
The Jess S. Jackson Sustainable Winery Building is designed for net-zero energy, carbon, and water thresholds. It is currently registered with the Living Building Challenge for Net Zero Certification (certification is based on the building's performance twelve months after opening date). The building's sustainable features include solar arrays, which offset the building's energy usage, and water storage tanks, which capture rain water for landscape irrigation. Process water is also treated and reused with the harvested rain water. Windows and the skylight are strategically placed for maximum natural daylight, the walls and roof of the building are highly insulated, the interior spaces are modular, allowing them to be adapted for new technology, and the outside landscape consists of native plants that treat runoff from the roof. The building also passively cools and heats itself as needed through natural ventiliation and thermal mass. Read in more detail about the Jess S. Jackson Sustainable Winery Building (PDF). 
In 2014, the building received the honor of Best Overall Sustainable Design in UC Berkeley Green Building Research Center's (GBRC) tenth annual Energy Efficiency and Sustainable Design Best Practice Awards program. Read GBRC's case study of the Jess S. Jackson Sustainable Winery Building. 

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The following buildings are under construction or in planning:

Classroom and Recital Hall (New Construction)
Foundation Plant Services Annex (New Construction)
At the Foundation Plant Services Annex there is designated parking for carpool and/or fuel efficient vehicles. The site also includes a new naturally vegetated stormwater retention basin. Displacement ventilation will minimize energy required by fan motors and hot water radiators will provide radiant heat where needed. Lighting energy was reduced and the building has north facing skylights.
Respiratory Disease Center (New Construction)
Silo renovation (Retail - Commercial Interiors)
South Silo renovation (Commercial Interiors)
South Valley Animal Health Laboratory (New Construction)

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The following buildings are on UC Davis property but 3rd party occupied and/or managed:


8th and Wake Graduate Housing - Registered for New Construction
8th and Wake (at the site of the former Castilian Hall buildings) features retention swales which treat storm water runoff, reflective roofing materials, water-efficient landscaping, low flow faucets, and reduced toilet flush volume fixtures. The two buildings exceed state energy efficiency standards by at least 20 percent and both buildings also have rooftop solar photovoltaic panels. Low emitting materials were chosen for adhesives, sealants, paints and coatings, and flooring systems. For more information, visit 8th and Wake's sustainable design webpage.

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